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"Chest CT Anatomy (Part 2) for Radiology Residents" by Kitt Shaffer MD PhD

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  • Global rating average: 4.0 out of 5
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This course is based on the recommended curriculum for Radiology residents of the Society of Thoracic Radiology. The focus is on normal anatomic structures as seen on routine chest CT scans in axial, sagittal and coronal planes.  Normal images are supplemented with explanatory images and with select abnormal images to facilitate distinction between expected and unexpected appearance of structures.  Abnormal examples also provide a clinical context for an appreciation of the importance of these structures in patient care.  Part 1 focuses on basic structures.  Part 2 deals with more detailed cardiovascular structures and more advanced topics.  Images used are from routine chest CT scans, not specialized gated cardiac studies.  For maximum learning, try to identify ALL labeled structures, not just the one asked about in each question.

This course is UNDER DEVELOPMENT!  Please send comments regarding any techinical problems or errors you encounter.

 

If you would like to just view the movies that are in the course, you can find them on my website:

 http://www.shafferseminars.net

created on: 11/15/09

  • Published 01/30/10
  • Learners 201
  • Views 5009
  • Questions 84

Course Details

Society of Thoracic Radiology curriculum in chest imaging for Radiology Residents, which can be downloaded as a PDF file at the following URL:

 

http://www.thoracicrad.org/education/resident_curriculum.htm

 

radiology residents

Reviews

Dr. B. Price Kerfoot
  • Your rating: 5 out of 5
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by Dr. B. Price Kerfoot on 01/31/10

This course does a beautiful job embedding quicktime videos of CT scans into the questions. It is very educational!

Sam Ko, MD, MBA
  • Your rating: 5 out of 5
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by Sam Ko, MD, MBA on 06/06/10

This course has AMAZING CT video footage of thoracic anatomy that is helpful for me as an emergency medicine resident. I highly recommend this course if you look at CT scans, whether or not you are in radiology. Dr. Shaffer, please make an abdominal CT course, in particular, with focus on the appendix :-) Thank you for your work!

felix ramirez ibarra
  • Your rating: 4 out of 5
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by felix ramirez ibarra on 04/15/11

exellent course, some problem with the answers option.

Zouheir Alameh
  • Your rating: 5 out of 5
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by Zouheir Alameh on 07/28/12

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Recent Reviews

  • Global rating average: 4.0 out of 5
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Published 07/28/12 by Zouheir Alameh
  • Global rating average: 4.0 out of 5
  • 4.0
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exellent course, some problem with the answers option.
Published 04/15/11 by felix ramirez ibarra
  • Global rating average: 4.0 out of 5
  • 4.0
  • 4.0
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  • 4.0
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This course has AMAZING CT video footage of thoracic anatomy that is helpful for me as an emergency medicine resident....
Published 06/06/10 by Sam Ko, MD, MBA
  • Global rating average: 4.0 out of 5
  • 4.0
  • 4.0
  • 4.0
  • 4.0
  • 4.0
This course does a beautiful job embedding quicktime videos of CT scans into the questions. It is very educational!
Published 01/31/10 by Dr. B. Price Kerfoot

Read all reviews

About Kitt Shaffer MD PhD

kittshaffer

Dr. Shaffer is a Professor at Boston University School of Medicine and Vice Chair for Radiology Education at Boston Medical Center.

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